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Belpop – an oral history of music

Vlaamse Radio- en Televisieomroeporganisatie
 
Time period: the second half of the 20th century until now
Number of interviews: ≥66
Accessibility: partially online
Period of interviews: 2008-now
Remarks:

Partially available online

Other seasons can be found in the VRT archives

Title: Belpop: de eerste vijftig jaar

Author: Jan Delvaux

Publisher: Borgerhoff & Lamberigts, Ghent, 2011
ISBN: 9789089312495

Belpop is a TV program about the Belgian pop scene on Canvas. It refers to belpop, a collective term for music by Belgian groups. Since 2008, each episode deals with one artist, sometimes several artists get the floor. They talk about the past of belpop. Between 2008 and 2020, Luc Janssen did the interviews and voice-over. As of 2023, Bent van Looy took over this task. Also see a review of this last season here.

 

Jan Delvaux, contributor to the program, also published a book in 2011 entitled Belpop: de eerste vijftig jaar, in which he describes the history of Belgian pop music, from Kili Watch of The Cousins to the present.

 

Also see the following video on belgian music history: Belpop Bonanza #1000 – Een duik in 40 jaar AB geschiedenis

Belga Sport

Vlaamse Radio- en Televisieomroeporganisatie
 
Time period: from the second half of the 20th century until now
Number of interviews: ≥100
Accessibility: via enquiry
Period of interviews: 2007-now
Remarks:

The episodes can be viewed in the VRT archive.

 

Belga Sport is a Flemish documentary television series depicting turning points in Belgian sports history. The program, made by Woestijnvis and shown on the Flemish public broadcaster Canvas, digs up fragments from the VRT sports archives and sheds new light on “known” facts through testimonies. The subtitle therefore reads Old sports stories in a new light. The first series was broadcast in the spring of 2007. A new series was recently released in 2024. In June 2008, Belga Sport was awarded the Prize of Television Criticism. And in early 2011, the program received a nomination from the Flemish Television Stars in the category “Best Information Program.

 

There is also a podcast with the creators of Belga Sport. Which can be found here.

An oral history of design

Vlaams Architectuurinstituut
 
Time period: 1916-2014
Number of interviews: 7 (8 people)
Accessibility: via application form
Transcripts: short summary
Period of interviews: 18 June 2014 - 19 January 2015
 

The cultural heritage of design does not consist only of sketches, models, photographs or correspondence of designers. With design, there is also a strong interaction between explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge, knowledge that may be passed on but which usually does not receive written expression. That is why the Flemish Architecture Institute conducted interviews with designers, policy makers and craftspeople. As a result, the interviews do not all cover the same topics and time periods. A mix of young and old and of profession was chosen; furniture maker, artist, design connoisseur and director of Design Flanders all have their say.

 

The following people were interviewed:

  • Leonce Dekeijser (1924-2015), interior architect, he explains that in his college days, “interior design” did not actually exist. He took courses with architects and decorative arts and eventually earned a degree in furniture art. He discusses the teaching methods, the subjects and his teachers. He talks about the interaction between design and education

  • José Vanderlinden (1920-?), furniture maker, the emphasis in the conversation with José Vanderlinden is, much more than in the conversation with Leonce Dekeijser, on the technical aspects of furniture making.

  • Luc (1953-now) and Katrien Mestdagh (1980-now), stained glass artists, the conversation includes the neo-Gothic tradition in Ghent in terms of stained glass painting, and how it lives on to this day in atelier Mestdagh. They discuss the need for commissioning.
  • Achiel Pauwels (1932-now), ceramist, he talks about how he learned the craft, how the teachers did not always give away the secrets of the craft just like that, and what the relationship was with the other art craft courses and the sculpture course. The conversation also explores the emphases he placed in his own classes and the importance he attached to drawing in doing so.
  • Moniek Bucquoye (1948-2022), connoisseur and promoter of design, the talk provides an insight into how product development education was shaped in Flanders from a historical perspective. She highlights the difference between product development and industrial design.
  • Lieven Daenens (1948-now), former director of the Design museum Ghent. Daenens discusses the evolution of the museum, its change of name and position with the advent of the museum decree in the 1990s. He discusses the quality of Belgian design culture and education in Belgium.
  • Johan Valcke (1952-now), director of Design Flanders, the conversation with Valcke gives an insight into how art crafts and design were viewed in Belgium and Flanders from an economic point of view and a historical perspective.

 

The four interviewers were art historians and artists: Katarina Serulu, Marieke Pauwels, Eva Van Regenmortel and Aletta Rambaut

Interviews with former employees of the Zuiderzee Museum

Zuiderzeecollectie
 
Time period: the second half of the 20th century
Number of interviews: 10 (10 people)
Accessibility: 8 fully accessible
Transcripts: partially
Period of interviews: 2022
Medium: audio files
 

To celebrate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Zuiderzee Museum in Enkhuizen, the Netherlands, in 2023. This was accompanied by a special exhibition, which was celebrated both by employees as well as former employees and volunteers. A start was made the year before to speak with former employees. Femke van Drongelen had tracked down several people who had helped build the outdoor museum, and ten former employees were also interviewed. Here you may find a video about the importance of these former employees.

 

Their stories illuminated the history of the museum and the history of Enkhuizen. All kinds of beautiful stories emerged as a result. These were incorporated into the exhibit.

 

The following people were interviewed:

  • Bert Kruissink
  • Erik Walsmit
  • Pieter Jutte
  • Siemen de Boer
  • Johan Jesterhout
  • Victor Kersten
  • Thedo Fruithof
  • Ferry Walberg
  • Sjaak Dangermond
  • Sjaak Tromp

Piet van der Ham

Voormalig Stichting Film en Wetenschap
 
Time period: 1910-1995
Number of interviews: 1 (1 person)
Accessibility: Restricted
Transcripts: None
Period of interviews: 1995
Remarks:

The collection has not yet been digitized and therefore cannot be viewed directly at Sound & Vision. Digitization can, however, be requested from Sound & Vision via: zakelijk@beeldengeluid.nl 

Medium: 3 cassette tapes
 

The interview with Piet van der Ham (born 1910) was made as part of Renate Bergsma’s research internship at SFW in 1995. It was incorporated into her doctoral thesis “Do you speak film? The Catholic filmmaker Piet van der Ham, Amsterdam (doctoral thesis Cultural Studies, UvA), 1995. Under the same title she published an article in the 1994 Yearbook Stichting Film en Wetenschap – Audiovisual Archive, Amsterdam: Stichting Film en Wetenschap, 1995, p.75-101.

 

Piet van der Ham has been characterized as a Catholic filmmaker. His “discovery” in 1936 as an amateur filmmaker by the filmmaker Otto van Neijenhoff was the impetus for a whole series of commissioned films from that angle. He was theoretically influenced by the Catholic ‘film pope’ Janus van Domburg and the writer-poet A.J.D. van Oosten and more generally by the aesthetic views of the Filmliga. With Van Oosten, he founded the Catholic film group Kafilgro. The amateur film Redt Volendam, made by Piet van der Ham and Goof Bloemen, can be found on the website of Beeld & Geluid.

 

During World War II he experimented with feature films, together with his friend Alfred Mazure, and worked as a photographer for the Internal Armed Forces. Over the years, he made many film journalistic contributions to newspapers such as De Tijd and de Maasbode and was associated with film magazines such as Filmfront and Filmforum. He was also involved in the Catholic Film Censorship Board. After the war, he made a number of films for the KVP, including the well-known De Opdracht (1956). He also made several corporate films and produced news items for Polygoon and the NTS. Finally, Van der Ham taught film and photography in The Hague.

Oral history of the Dutch Broadcasting Company

Collection of the Broadcasting Museum and the Institute for Sound and Vision
 
Time period: 1930-1980 and 1940-2012
Number of interviews: 170
Accessibility: For research purposes
Period of interviews: 1982-1993 and 2010-2012
Remarks:

The items can be found in DAAN, the digital archive of Sound & Vision, by the metadata creatorname “Vossen” of the terms “Oral history van de omroep” 

 

In the 1980s, the Broadcasting Museum, the predecessor of the Institute for Sound and Vision, realised that the time was ripe to record the stories of the pioneers of the National Broadcasting Corporation. The programme makers were now well into their old age. The Broadcasting Museum took this opportunity to record their life stories for posterity. These interviews – initiated by Harrie Vossen – contain valuable information about the early years of broadcasting and the further lives of the pioneers. After thirty years new interviews were held. 

 

This collection therefore consists of two parts that differ in character: the first set of 31 audio interviews with broadcasting pioneers dates from 1982-1993 and were conducted by Harrie Vossen. They therefore fall under the Harrie Vossen collection and can be found via DAAN, the digital archive of Sound & Vision with the metadata creator name: “Vossen”. These interviews cover the period 1930-1980 and highlight the early years of the National Broadcasting Company. Also see the following two overviews on the wiki of Sound & Vision concerning the collection Harrie Vossen and broadcasting pioneers: first, an overview of the interviewees of these interviews. Second, an overview of these interviews themselves with parts of the transcripts. The collection Harrie Vossen is a treasure trove for information regarding broadcasting pioneers.

 

The second series of 139 interviews is from 2010-2012 and deals with employees’ experiences of working for broadcasting. These interviews cover the period 1940-2012. Both young and old participated in these interviews so the content varies widely. These interviews can be found in the archive of Sound and Vision under the series Oral History of Broadcasting.

 

Also see our article on this collection “De verborgen schat van Beeld & Geluid” (The hidden treasure of Beeld & Geluid)

Gé van der Werff

Voormalig Stichting Film en Wetenschap
 
Time period: 1925-1990
Number of interviews: 1 (1 person)
Accessibility: Restricted
Transcripts: None
Period of interviews: 1992
Remarks:

The collection has not yet been digitized and therefore cannot be viewed directly at Sound & Vision. Digitization can, however, be requested from Sound & Vision via: zakelijk@beeldengeluid.nl 

Medium: 2 cassette tapes
 

The interview was conducted as part of Selier’s doctoral research on the history of Dutch (press) photography. The main purpose of this interview was to find out more about THE Polygoon Photo Press Agency during the occupation years and the establishment of the ANP Photo Press Agency after the war, into which Polygoon Photo was incorporated, including the photo archive, which, incidentally, was destroyed for a significant part. About the archive and what remains of it, Selier wrote the article “Polygoon photo archive,” in: GBG-News 20, pp. 7-9 (Photohistorical Front Message series).

 

Before the war, Van der Werff worked as a press photographer in the photo department of the film and photo production company Polygoon in Haarlem. In 1938, he was seconded to The Hague. However, he left the company in 1941 and returned to Haarlem to earn his living as a “town hall” photographer for several years. After the war, he was the first photographer employed by the newly established ANP Photo Press Agency, where he remained until his retirement. Van der Werff also talks about fellow photographers, including Aart Klein.

Lou Lichtveld, literature and colonial Suriname

Annemieke Kaan
 
Time period: 1921-1984
Number of interviews: 1 (1 person)
Accessibility: for research purposes
Transcripts: none
Period of interviews: 15 September 1984
Remarks:

The collection has not yet been digitized and therefore cannot be viewed directly at Sound & Vision. Digitization can, however, be requested from Sound & Vision via: zakelijk@beeldengeluid.nl

In DAAN, the digital archive of Sound & Vision the following item can be found: Oral History 19-11-1987 VPRO, an interview with Lichtveld concerning his work as a member of the purification commission for broadcasting

Also see a four hour long interview with Lichtveld from the VPRO

Medium: 1 audio tape
 

Annemieke Kaan interviewed Lou Lichtveld (1903-1996) for her doctoral thesis on history (RUU) on Suriname. Helman speaks about the government of the former Dutch colony and about his literary work.

 

Lichtveld came to the Netherlands at the age of 18, did journalistic work, studied music and developed into a (film) composer and film critic. He went back to Suriname in 1949 and held several public positions in the country. For example, he served as Minister of Education from 1949-51 and as Minister Plenipotentiary of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in the 1960s. He also emerged as an inspiring figure in Surinamese cultural life. For his books he often chose the country as a subject, although he mainly addressed a Dutch audience. Later he settled in the Netherlands again.

Catholics and cinema: film criticism and film censorship

Ernst Radius
 
Time period: 1945-1986
Number of interviews: 1 (1 person)
Accessibility: for research purposes
Transcripts: none
Period of interviews: July 1986
Remarks:

Type interview: scientific

The collection has not yet been digitized and therefore cannot be viewed directly at Sound & Vision. Digitization can, however, be requested from Sound & Vision via: zakelijk@beeldengeluid.nl

Medium: 2 cassette tapes
 

Ernst Radius talks with Bob Bertina (1914-2012) about Dutch Catholics’ attitudes toward film after 1945. The relationship between Christians and film has never been unequivocal. Bertina was a film critic for the Volkskrant for many years, a member of the editorial board of several (Catholic) film magazines and involved in Katholieke Film Actie (KFA). In particular, it discusses the Catholic film censorship, organized in the Katholieke Film Centrale (KFC), in which leading film critics – besides Bertina Charles Boost and Janus van Domburg – played a role. Between 1945 and 1979, Bertina wrote about films in the Volkskrant. In his early days, film was still considered immoral by the Catholic Church. When the Volkskrant became a progressive newspaper in the late 1960s, Bertina welcomed it. He always sided with art.

 

Bertina explains the not unproblematic relationship between film criticism and film censorship. The premise endorsed by both ‘camps’, ‘work for good film’, was given different interpretations because the former reasoned primarily from an aesthetic point of view and the latter took a primarily moralistic stance. Bertina refers with approval to the brochure Film en moraal [Film and morality], which the progressive ‘filmpater’ Jac. Dirkse once wrote and in which he advocated, among other things, an independent relationship between Catholic film critics and the Catholic film censors.

 

Also see this article by Bertina’s that dives into Dutch film critique and Catholicism after the Second World War

Graphic design, Cyprian Kościelniak and vocation

Esther Boukema
 
Time period: unknown (possibly 1974-1988)
Number of interviews: 2 (9 people)
Accessibility: for research purposes
Transcripts: none
Period of interviews: 1988
Remarks:

The collection has not yet been digitized and therefore cannot be viewed directly at Sound & Vision. Digitization can, however, be requested from Sound & Vision via: zakelijk@beeldengeluid.nl

Medium: 3 cassette tapes
 

This collection contains basically two types of interviews. First of all, Esther Boukema interviewed the originally Polish graphic designer Cyprian Kościelniak in 1988 about the characteristics of a good poster, the function of the poster, the relation poster – society, the relation poster – art, the importance of developing one’s own style and the work of Kościelniak himself.

This interview is therefore not only about the profession and the technical side of graphic design but also about social criticism. This puts Kościelniak in line with his father Władysław Kościelniak, an artist and avid columnist. Boukema incorporated this interview into a thesis for the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten in Utrecht. The interview is in English.

 

Secondly, Esther Boukema and Assi Kootstra interviewed eight (anonymous) graduating graphic design students about their motivation and ambitions. These eight were interviewed together. This information was intended for a publication in the form of an article in the (graduation) newspaper of the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten.

 

The following people were interviewed:

  • Cyprian Kościelniak (1948-now), in 1974 he graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. He is a Polish graphic designer and has lived in the Netherlands since 1986. He is the son of the well-known artist and columnist Władysław Kościelniak.

  • 8 graphic design students from the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten in Utrecht

     

An article about Cyrian Kościelniak

Examples of his art