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Prominent Gelderlanders

 

Prominent Gelderlanders

5 digitised interviews

Gelderland Heritage

 

Investigating whether and how the collection can be archived and made public

Interviews with striking Gelderlanders

Mien van der Meulen-Nulle
(The Hague, 17 March 1884 – Winterswijk, 8 January 1982)

Louisa Wilhelmina (Mien) van der Meulen-Nulle was a Dutch teacher of lace technology and director of the Royal Dutch Lace School in The Hague.

Nulle studied useful handicrafts at the Industrieschool voor Meisjes in The Hague. She came into contact with lace through books. She received additional lessons from Elisabeth Manhave, a former pupil of the lace school in Sluis. In 1903, she taught at the Lace School, then based in Apeldoorn. At the age of 22, she became headmistress of the lace school in 1906 when it moved to The Hague. She was given access to an attached studio. She designed the cradle cover for Princess Juliana in 1909. On the occasion of a parade in Leiden depicting the entry of Frederik Hendrik in 1629, she designed several 17th-century lace based on paintings in 1910. It earned several awards.

 

Louis Frequin
(Arnhem, 29 July 1914 – Berg en Dal, 13 October 1998)

Interview on 11 August 1976 (tape 1 missing – interview 28 April 1976)

Louis Hendrik Antonius (Louis) Frequin was a Dutch journalist, author and resistance fighter. Louis Frequin was married and had eight children, the oldest of whom, Willibrord Frequin, is the best known.

Louis Frequin was Roman Catholic and had worked in journalism since 1930. Former editor-in-chief of the Gelderlander and the Nieuwe Krant.

 

Herman Martinus Oldenhof
(Apeldoorn, 17 September 1899 – Ede, 11 April 1985)

Interviewer J.P. Gansenbrink, 21 July 1977

Oldenhof was a Dutch mayor. He was a member of the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP). Oldenhof was mayor of the municipalities of Lopik, Jaarsveld and Willige Langerak from 1929 to 1936. He then served as mayor of Kampen from 1936 to 1942 and from 1945 to 1952.

Oldenhof left for the municipality of Ede, where he was mayor until 1962. Under his administration, the municipality grew from 47,656 to 60,162 inhabitants and much was invested in new education and infrastructure. In 1962, he became deputy of the province of Gelderland. He continued to live in Ede, though. Here he died in 1985 at the age of 85 in retirement home De Klinkenberg.

 

 

Jan Taminiau
(1 April 1903 – 17 July 1993)

Interviewer G. J. Mentink, 16 October 1975

Taminiau was director of the Gelderland fruit processing company Taminiau Elst Overbetuwe (TEO)

 

Jan Hendrik de Groot
(Alkmaar 13 March 1901 – Zeist 1 December 1990)

Jan H. de Groot was a poet, journalist in Arnhem.

In 1948, he became editor of Het Vrije Volk in Arnhem and from 1950 until his retirement in 1966, he was press chief of the AKU in Arnhem. From 1950 to 1962, he was secretary and treasurer of the Dutch branch of the international authors’ association PEN.

Sisters of ‘t Ketrientje

boz - 0478 Foto Archief Bergen op Zoom - Franciscanessen van Huize Sint Catharina, 1917

Zusters van ‘t Ketrientje

Annelies van Heijst en Dolly Verhoeven

Uitgeverij Vantilt

ISBN 9789460041464

The Franciscans of Bergen op Zoom, or the Sisters of ‘t Ketrientje, have a long tradition of providing care. In 1838, they started in the Algemeen Burgerlijk Gasthuis, where they cared for the sick and infirm of various faiths. From 1857, they also took care of orphans, and in 1882 they also started caring for the elderly. They did so in the St. Catharinagesticht, which also housed their congregation’s mother house. The sisters were also active outside Bergen op Zoom. In 1933, far beyond the Dutch borders, they started a mission in Soekaboemie on Java. During the war years, twelve of the mission sisters were in a Japanese camp there. After Indonesia became independent, the foreign branch of the congregation increasingly stood on its own two feet, and in 1996 it also became formally independent.
In the past 175 years, nearly 400 women committed themselves for life to this sister congregation. In the 21st century, the congregation is ageing, like other religious congregations in the West. Although the Sisters do not like to be the centre of attention, they are featured in this book and Bergen residents tell about them. This brings to life what generations of Sisters of ‘t Ketrientje have done since 1838 and what they have meant to the church and society.