menu
Geef een of meerdere zoektermen op.
Gebruik dubbele aanhalingstekens om in de exacte woordvolgorde te zoeken.

An oral history of the Groningen gas extraction

The Eyewitnesses of Gas Extraction project will record the stories of at least 100 people on video over the next two years (from April 2024). In this way, recent history will be told through personal stories in a unique way. Many stories have already been collected in recent years. But never before have the testimonies of residents and those involved in gas extraction been recorded in a systematic and scientific way. This initiative is being led by researcher Nienke Busscher and counselor Marjo van Bergen. The first interviews are expected to be recorded starting April 2024. So you can still participate in this project!

 

Here you may find more information concerning this project.

And here you may contact the project and participate in the interviews.

Here you may find an NPO interview with the leaders of this project.

 

Ooggetuigen van de Gaswinning is an initiative of nine organizations with roots in Groningen based on an idea by Diepduik Media. Each party contributes its own expertise, guaranteeing (scientific) quality. A foundation is being set up especially for this project. In this way, independence is guaranteed and the proceeds of the project can be properly and carefully managed.

The history of us all

 

The history of slavery is a very painful, important and until recently underexposed part of our shared history. During the Slavery History Commemoration Year, which runs from July 1, 2023 to July 1, 2024, the entire kingdom will pay extra attention to this past and its repercussions in the present. The Ministry of Education, Culture and Science has a coordinating role in the organization of the Slavery History Memorial Year. With the goal of increasing knowledge and awareness of this theme in society. BKB, AMARU and Canvas Black together created the communication strategy and campaign for the Slavery History Memorial Year.

 

The Slavery Past Memorial Year marks the 150th anniversary of the actual abolition of slavery. By commemorating our slavery past, we ensure that we do not forget this history. Commemoration reminds us that it should never happen again. We pay attention to the pain, suffering and far-reaching consequences, as well as the resistance of enslaved people and the pride of their descendants and in the history before slavery. By sharing stories, and making the slavery past an equal part of our history, we keep this history alive.

 

The campaign “The history of us all’ consists of six conversations, focusing on the personal experiences of well-known storytellers. The campaign takes place entirely online. All six conversations can be found online.

 

The following conversations can be found online:

1. Shirma Rouse (singer) and Safi Graauw (director)
2. Lucelle Comvalius (teacher) and George Adegite (illustrator)
3. Hesdy Lonwijk (director) and Carmen Felix (writer)
4. Lukas Eleuwarin (creator of the fashion brand Knowledge by Roots) and Jill Mathon (writer)
5. Lex Bohlmeijer (presenter) and Prof. Soortkill (writer)

The last conversation can eventually be found on the site.

 

Some conversations received a sequel. This can be found at the bottom of linked pages.

Hidden stories of the Dutch Caribbean

Photo: Rose Mary Allen interviews woman on Curaçao in the 1980s.

Since the 1950s, visionary pioneers such as Paul Brenneker, Elis Juliana, Bòi Antoin and Rose Mary Allen have dedicated themselves to collecting oral history interviews in the Dutch Caribbean. These interviews contain personal stories, traditions, songs, proverbs and language of older generations in that area. Some of this material has been digitised and is accessible to a wide audience, but much of it is still on outdated cassette tapes and VHS Tapes. If this material is not digitised soon, important stories within history risk being lost.

 

In close collaboration with Rose Mary Allen, Sound and Vision, DANS en het National Archive Curaçao, the Hub Sprekende Geschiedenis start digitising, making accessible and presenting the oral history interviews conducted by Rose Mary Allen. This valuable material, recorded between 1980 and 1995, includes interviews with people on the islands, migrant communities and (grand)children of enslaved people. It constitutes important source material for an in-depth and layered historiography of the Caribbean and contributes to the identity formation of current and future generations.

 

The project aims to:

  1. Digitisation and preservation: Digitising and permanently preserving oral history material, starting with the work of Rose Mary Allen.
  2. Searchability: Making the interview material searchable, including translating transcripts from Papiamentu to Dutch and English.
  3. Presentation to the public: Developing (digital) forms of presentation of the material for a wide audience in the Caribbean and the Netherlands, in cooperation with young people, artists and the Nationaal Archief Curaçao.

With the Storianan Skondi di Karibe project, we aim to preserve the stories of the past for the future. By working together, we hope to bridge generations, cultures and communities, bringing the rich heritage of the Caribbean to life for a new generation.

 

Keep following our website and social media channels for more information on the project, its progress and the partners involved.

 

This project is co-sponsored by the Stimuleringsfonds.

 

 

 

 

 

SOLIGION

KU leuven

 

 

This study on Catholic-inspired poverty care in Brussels between 1945 and 2000 is conducted by doctoral student Els Minne. Central to the research is the question of how Catholic poverty organisations managed their religious identity in a society that was firmly rooted in Catholic traditions, but where the pressures of ‘secularisation’ and ‘modernity’ began to increase. The research starts from eight case studies of both Catholic personalities and Catholic-inspired organisations that took up the fight against poverty.

 

Through an analysis of letters, newspaper articles, publications and oral history, the practices and discourses of these actors are examined. What help did these organisations offer, and what target group did they have in mind? What role did religion, from volunteers or clients, play in the organisations? In what ways did they try to influence political policy or academic research on poverty? How did the organisations respond to the increasingly diverse group of people living in poverty? By seeking answers to these questions, the project aims to complement knowledge about the role of religion and welfare states with local experiences, thoughts and practices.

The district nurse has the floor: stories from district practice

Wijkverpleegkundige in Pieterburen. Foto © FNI

Mia Vrijens

Medeaanvrager: prof. dr. M.S. Parry (UvA)
Instelling:

Florence Nightingale Instituut

(FNI)

Vereniging Verplegenden & Verzorgenden Nederland

(V&VN)

Interviews:

vanaf 2024

This oral history project creates a new archive of district nurses’ experiences and memories through reflections on objects from the Florence Nightingale Institute’s existing heritage collection. The project realises an addition to the history and heritage of (district) nursing and offers new insights into how currently district nurses have a place in society.

 

Read the article on the V&VN website (venvn.nl)

LINK to the article 

 

Disability and Self-Governance

Foto Harry Pot / Anefo (CC0): Mies Bouwman tijdens de actie Open het Dorp

Projectleider

prof. dr. M.K. Baár

Onderzoekers
dr. P.W. van Trigt
prof. dr. M.K. Baár
E. Pollaert

Instelling: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Tijdsduur: 1 juni 2022 tot 1 juni 2027

Onderzoeksprogramma: SGW Open Competitie

Dossiernummer: 406.20.HW.004

The Village: the idea of an accessible neighbourhood for people with disabilities is gaining traction in several countries. Together with two PhD students, Baár and Van Trigt will investigate how this spread took place. They also want to map the local history of the neighbourhood near Arnhem, partly by using oral history to record residents’ stories. The project should also help to safeguard Het Dorp’s endangered archives and historical objects, which are falling into deterioration.

 

How can engagement with the concept of disability contribute to writing more inclusive histories? The project pioneers this concept as its central analytical category for undertaking the first comprehensive historical study of Het Dorp â?? a self-governing, accessible residential community for people with severe physical disabilities and chronic illness near Arnhem which was initiated in 1962 by the largest telethon in Dutch history. Employing the methodologies of global microhistory and participatory heritagization the research pursues four major aims:

 

  1. It reconstructs the (micro) history of het Dorp and uses it as a platform for addressing issues of societal exclusion & inclusion, accessible living, citizens’ rights and responsibilities and the changing role of the welfare state in providing for vulnerable groups in the Netherlands and globally
  2. It generates new insights into postwar global history by illuminating het Dorps enormous and hitherto entirely unrecognized impact as a model inclusive establishment in several countries across the world and by reconstructing its extensive transnational networks which crossed ideological divides.
  3. It adopts a public history perspective and with the active participation of het Dorps community members it integrates its multifarious societal, cultural and architectural legacy into the field of heritage and memory studies.
  4. Synthetizing the accumulated knowledge at the meta-level it instigates new theoretical and empirical avenues in the historiography of disability that challenge and diversify the Anglo-American perspectives currently dominating the field.

 

 

 

Mothers of the past

© Karen Juliane / Nationaal Archief / Spaarnestadphoto

© Karen Juliane / Nationaal Archief / Spaarnestadphoto

For a new project commissioned by publisher Ambo Anthos, writer and journalist Truska Bast is looking for women, over seventy, who want to talk candidly about motherhood.

 

Through their personal stories, she hopes to discover how motherhood has changed, or not. What expectations did these women have before becoming mothers? How were pregnancy and childbirth viewed in their time, and how did they themselves experience it? How did motherhood affect relationships, such as those with their partner, family, friends? How do they look at parenting then and now? What did they do differently from their own mothers, what did they pass on? What did motherhood mean for their education, job, career? And, finally, what if they were allowed to do it all over again?

 

Narrators should count on two 2-2.5-hour interviews, at their homes (if possible). This is preceded by a short telephone introduction that is non-binding for both parties. This is intended to clarify mutual expectations and to ensure that a variety of women are interviewed in terms of age, family situation, education and background. The final selection is made in consultation with publisher Ambo Anthos.

Smart Care: Artist Intent and Artist Interviews’ launched

Status: In progress

Project lead: dr. S. Stigter

Institution: University of Amsterdam

Duration: 1 August 2023 to 31 July 2024

Research programme: XS

File number: 406.XS.01.148

From 1 August, Sanneke Stigter’s project Smart Care: Artist Intent and Artist Interviews will start. The project, which was granted funding in NWO’s Open Competition SGW – XS, focuses on whether artificial intelligence could take over the artist’s voice in conservation research.

 

The Open Competition SGW – XS gives researchers with a promising idea or an innovative and risky initiative the chance to apply for funding for their research. Proposed projects have to be groundbreaking and contribute to existing and new scientific insights.

 

The granted project:

 

Smart Care: Artist Intent and Artist Interviews
Conducting interviews with artists, curators and other stakeholders is essential in conservation research to understand unconventional contemporary works of art. However, artist intent is not unambiguous and may evolve over time and be shaped or changed in the dialogue with artists. What if the artist is no longer around; could artificial intelligence then take over the artist’s voice? This project investigates this wicked question to support decision-making around reinstallation and restoration of complex artworks in a ground-breaking approach nurturing smart care for a sustainable future of complex artworks.

 

PROJECT PAGE NWO

Artist Interview met Lydia Schouten. Foto: Sanneke Stigter
 

Veterans

Een uitzinnige menigte begroet de binnenrijdende voertuigen van de Prinses Irene Brigade te Den Haag, op de vroege avond van 8 mei 1945. Collectie Menno Huizinga, NIOD - 216947
 

Sub-study 4: ‘Veterans’
Currently in progress by the Netherlands Veterans Institute (NLVi)

 

This study asks different generations within veteran families about the memories, stories and images of the Second World War that live with them, and how they themselves experience freedom and unfreedom. It examines how memories of the war past of the (grand)parent (veteran) carry over to subsequent generations and how the collective social awareness and handling of a particular war past influences the memories of different generations.

With the Veterans sub-study, the Netherlands Veterans Institute contributes to the multi-year research of the National Committee 4 and 5 May, in which other remembrance communities are also surveyed.

 

The research project ‘War and freedom in three generations’ runs from 2021 to 2025. One or two sub-studies will be carried out each year. Each substudy focuses on a different memory community within which five families are interviewed each time. The interviews cover three different generations; in addition to the war generation itself, representatives from the second and third generations are also spoken to separately.

With this study, the committee aims to investigate how memories of (grand)parents’ wartime past carry over to subsequent generations and how family stories form in practice.

Does social awareness and collective handling of a particular war past (e.g. recognition, denial, concealment or disinterest) influence the memories of the different generations and the family stories that are passed on? Do these war memories influence views on or perceptions of freedom? And how do younger generations position themselves within this memory landscape?

 

Sub-studies

Sub-study 1: ‘Labour deployment
Sub-study 2: ‘Dutch East Indies/Indonesia’
Currently in progress

Sub-study 3: ‘Roma and Sinti
Currently in progress

Sub-study 5: ‘Jewish families
Currently in preparation

Forced labour during World War II

Sub-study 1 – Labour deployment

 

An estimated 500,000 to 630,000 Dutch men worked compulsorily in Germany during World War II. During this Arbeitseinsatz, civilians were compulsorily employed to keep the German economy running, while German men served in the army. Forced labour is thus a part of history involving many Dutch families. Yet this history is not part of Dutch, European, or global collective memory. As a result, it is plausible that the subject is not alive among a broad public, but is within affected families.
The question is what memories live on within families under these circumstances and what the impact of the memories is into the third generation.

 

The research project ‘War and freedom in three generations’ will run from 2021 to 2025. One or two sub-studies will be carried out each year. Each sub-study focuses on a different memory community within which five families are interviewed each time. The interviews cover three different generations; in addition to the war generation itself, representatives from the second and third generations are also spoken to separately.

With this study, the committee aims to investigate how memories of (grand)parents’ wartime past carry over to subsequent generations and how family stories form in practice.

Does social awareness and collective handling of a particular war past (e.g. recognition, denial, concealment or disinterest) influence the memories of the different generations and the family stories that are passed on? Do these war memories influence views on or perceptions of freedom? And how do younger generations position themselves within this memory landscape?

 

Sub-study 2: ‘Dutch East Indies/Indonesia’

The Japanese occupation in 1942 brought an abrupt end to Dutch colonial rule in the Indonesian archipelago. Part of the population was interned, taken prisoner of war or employed as forced laborers, and many tried to survive in (very) relative freedom. After the Japanese surrender in 1945, several conflicts and developments followed that were important for the migration of part of the population to the Netherlands, including the Indonesian revolution, the New Guinea issue but also the anti-communist violence in the mid-1960s. The first generation of eyewitnesses to this history is leaving us, there is room among younger generations for a new look at the colonial past and attention to the diversity of (war) experiences in the Indonesian archipelago. What does this transition mean for the way memories are passed on intergenerationally and for the effect of the war past in the present?

 

Sub-study 3: ‘Roma and Sinti
Currently in progress

Sub-study 4: ‘Veterans
Currently being carried out by the Dutch Veterans Institute (NLVi)

Sub-study 5: ‘Jewish families
Currently in preparation